Antworten
72 Beiträge • Seite 1 von 5
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 03 Aug 2007 21:25
Hello,

Tobi suggested I could post in English. I can back cross translation engines to check and translate without runing the languages(English to => German= then back to Enlgish again to check then edit where needed)

I have been told many have questions about the number of methods I use and have developed. I can and will answer all such questions that you might have.

I am known namely for EI dosing methods, but I am hardly a one trick pony (I do many methods).
I also have an extensive research lab and research grade equipment for testing every parameter.
I use a Hach DR 2800 for most chemical parameters, LiCor Light meter, Modified reference CO2 pH/KH probe, O2 meters.

I generally suggest Hach or Lamotte test kits along with calibrating the test kit each time you do a series of test, just like we do in research.

I am emperical generally, but use the plants and algae as "test kits" ultimately as well as fish and shrimps and various other organisms.

I think some misconceptions have long existsed in the hobby and are based around past northern lake research, limnologist have long argued that macrophytes(aquatic plants and Chara /Nitella namely) are very different in shallow tropical and subtropical lakes.

The plant define these systems, not the nutrients.

I am familiar with many of the researchers and groups working in Northern Europe, Ole and Troels from Tropica s well as Claus are all good friends that I have know for some time.

We have little disagreement, it's the hobbyists that have all the issues! haha!
Sad, but true.

I question things when as hobbyists we make statements and then test and see if such advice and the hypothesis are correct.

Like most researchers, I use the priniple of falsification (See Karl Popper for more).
If we assume that excess PO4 => algae blooms in aquatic plant aquariums, then adding Excess PO4 to an otherwise stable reference tank should induce algae if all other factors are non limiting.

If we do not see such a response, then we can conclude that excess PO4 does not = algae in a planted aquarium.

By adding large amounts of inorganic PO4 via KH2PO4, to 2.0ppm of PO4, we can safely assume that is "excess".

We have been doing this for over a decade in the USA, and still no one has found a correlation between excess PO4 and algae.

Thats a long time and thousands of planted aquariums!
This is not some abberation of outlying data point.
And it is specific for planted aquariums and applies to denser planted tanks with 50-70% coverage or higher.

CO2, Excel or non CO2, and also, in subtropical lakes with 50% or more coverage that have aquatic vegatation (Florida, USA has 7800 lakes and many are well planted, see Bachman 2004 for more).

These are far more like our aquariums(shallow, warm, fully planted).

Bachmann, Canfield, Hoyer and vrtually all the limnologist in Florida will state that there is no correlation between trophic status and algae or aquatic plants.

None.

We can test this in our tanks as well.
Neither the specific research nor the test we do in our tanks suggest that PO4 causes algae at high excess levels.

Note, this merely disproves what cannot cause algae, it does not imply what s causing algae in your tank or that there is no correlation, just it cannot be a cause.

Adding PO4 to an otherwise limited tank can increase the CO2 demand a great deal. This in turn if not adjusted abd balanced to account for this will lead to algae, but that's the CO2, not the PO4 that is the cause.

Such interactions often lead aqaurist to conclude that correlation = cause.
This is much like convicting a person in th a court of Law based on mere circumstantial evidence rather tha beyond a reasonable doubt.

As jurists, hopefully aquarists will judge based on strong criteria than circumstantial evidence and not accuse the innocent :lol:

I've been adding high PO4 for over 15 years.
We have many PO4 limiting hobbyists here in the USA in past to compoare the results with.

Regarding the results:

Bild

Bild

Bild


Regards,
Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 03 Aug 2007 21:35
Here's some more tanks that all use EI dosing and have for many years:

Bild

Bild

Bild

Bild

Bild

If the levels are toxic, why have the Discus bred and the Apistos?
How is it that I can keep and raise large numbers of Altum angels without issue?

I do not subscribe to luck or magic.

Let's look further into the research:

Several years ago many folks claimed excess nutrients caused algae such as "excess" PO4 and NO3. I wanted to know how much excess it would take for this to occur, so I added it to see(testing). Some simple test can easily prove these assetions are patently false.

More recently, another group decided to claim that higher PO4 and NO3 are bad for fish. There are no PO4 toxic levels published in many cases because it's virtually non toxic over the ranges ever encountered by aquarists(say 10ppm or less).

Much like the algae testing of past, the claims are similar in their arguement and approach for fish health. They make the hypothesis, but they offer no back up support, no test, no primary research support, no methods, nothing other than nice fuzzy words.

What has been published:

Pierce et al 1993 suggested for marine fish:
"Previous studies have indicated that long term exposure to nitrate-N levels above 100 mg/L may be detrimental to fish(440ppm). This study was undertaken to assess the acute toxicity of nitrate to five species of marine fish, while efforts were taken to reduce the nitrate concentration in the recirculating systems."

Marco 1999, suggests that warm water species have a suggested range of "recommended levels of nitrate for warm-water fishes (90 mg N-NO3-/L)"

That's N as NO3, so 4.4X 90 = ~400ppm NO3.

Quite high.

here's a link to the common fathead minnow:

SETAC Journals Online - ACUTE AND CHRONIC TOXICITY OF NITRATE TO FATHEAD MINNOWS (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS), CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA, AND DAPHNIA MAGNA

Do the math for the conversion of N-NO3 to NO3 for ppms.
Quite high huh? Note the sensitivity differences for inverts, they are much better test subjects than fish.

Still not convinced?

Well take a long look at the Fish and NO3 toxicity section in this good review paper at table 3:

http://www.s2.chalmers.se/~tw/DOWNLOAD/ ... limits.pdf

It's fully assessible.

Remember to multipy by 4.4 to get NO3ppms rather than N-NO3!

As you can see, the ranges are extremely high and that warmer water fish tend to have a greater ability to withstand NO3 levels as well. When fish breed, this representst the behavior(positive good) and the most sensntive life stanges(eggs and fry). I routinely have breeding occur in such higher NO3 tanks(30-40ppm etc).

Now some have made claims that my advice concerning NO3 dosing is bad for fish and they have not supported with test, with primary research, nor applied plant tank experience neither over short term nor over long term test.
I've done test with Ghost and amano shrimp and gone to over 160ppm with ghost shrimp and Amano's before death occured. No fish where adversely affected.

Now I ask them to stand before others to show their evidence rather than preceptions to show and prove otherwise.

What I hear from:

1. Calims about less is better(but they rarely say how much less or over what acceptable range, where the risk cut off is/do we gain for maintaining a tighter control)
2. No supporting primary research(still waiting for one review)
3. Anecdotal advice and heresay from other web sites
4. Toxicity citations about humans, not fish
5. No toxcity test of their own to deny/confirm(they make claims/critiques and then do not test their own questions to see if they are correct)
6. Claims that behaviors change(how do we measure this?They offer no solutions, reproductive is a good one I suggest)
7. Ability to set up a control tank and do a repeatable test.
8. Ability to breed and raise fry of several species of a fish in their tanks.
9. Lack long term usage of the higher NO3 levels as they assume they are bad and do not attempt them out of fear.

The burden of proof is upon the critic here.

I've done my job supporting my advice, spent the time testing, have years of fish health to draw upon, the real question folks should ask: have the critics done their job supporting their advice?

I just don't see it.

This is not personal, this is about the topic and getting an answer.
Not assuming less is better or that high levels are really bad or not without first trying it out and seeing if that is the case, not by circumstantial evidence(do you convict a poor innocent nutrient based on circumstantial evidence alone?) or correlation alone, rather, beyond a reasonable doubt.
They get irritated when I go after them about supporting their position, take it personally etc, but the bottom line is not a personal issue, it's about the fish, the hobby and the methods we use the advice that is given.

I do not roll over and accept criticism when it's plainly wrong. I'll still come back and pound the issue till they offer up evidence, not personal remarks.
We look at the observations and facts, set up a test to see if our hypothesis is correct or not, then make a conclusion.

I've done this.
I've provided strong background support.
I've supported my own hypothesis that higher levels are not detrimental to fish or reproduction through testing.
I've repeated such test for years on many species that are supposedly sensitive softer water species.
I've bred, as have many others, fish in such tanks.

Now mine you, I'm not going around suggesting that other methods and advice are detrimental to fish or cause algae. These critics are bringing this up all on their own. I have little issue with folks supporting their usage of a method whatever it may be, but when they malign the methods and advice I suggest in the process, I will defend it.

When I defend the advice, some have suggested I am a bad guy, make lots of personal asumptions about me(some are downright funny however, they are really clueless about others and very assumptive) and am not a nice person. Again using a personalization argument rather than one that supports their position.
My personal life and aspects have no bearing here .........nor should it.

This is about NO3 and fish/shrimp.
PFK picked up on this as well:

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/p ... p?news=560

I have not eben talked much about algae and testing with them :D


Regards,
Tom Barr

[hr]
Ãœbersetzung/Translation von Tom Barrs posts:
(Recht flott übersetzt...deshalb nicht 100% akkurat... sollte aber alles wiedergeben ;))

Mir wurden schon viele Fragen bezüglich der Methoden die ich nutze und entwickelt habe gestellt. Ich werde alle Fragen beantworten, die ihr diesbezüglich habt.

Ich bin primär durch den Estimative Index bekannt, aber ich bin bei weitem keine Person die nur eine Richtung einschlägt (ich nutze viele Methoden)

Ich habe ein gut ausgestattetes Labor und gute Werkzeuge, um alle Werte genau zu testen. Ich benutze primär einen Hach DR 2800, um die chemischen Werte zu bestimmen, LiCor Lichtmesser, ein modifiziertes Standard CO2 pH/KH Messgerät und ein Sauerstoffmessgerät.

Ich benutze primär Hach oder Lamotte Tests, welche jedes Mal vor der Testreihe kalibriert werden, so wie es in der Forschung generell gemacht wird.

Meine Befunde sind primär empirisch, aber ich nutze ebenfalls die Pflanzen und Algen als "Tests", genauso wie Fische, Garnelen und viele andere Organismen.

Ich glaube viele Missverständnisse haben sich in der Aquaristik breit gemacht, die auf Untersuchungen von Seen aus nördlichen Breitengraden beruhen. Limnologen haben aber lange darauf hingewiesen, dass Makrophyten (Wasserpflanzen und Chara/Nitella Arten) sich sehr unterschiedlich in flachen tropischen Gewässern und subtropischen Seen verhalten.

Die Pflanzen machen dabei das System aus, nicht die Nährstoffe.

Ich bin sehr vertraut mit vielen Forschern und Forschungsgruppen aus Nordeuropa. Ole und Troels von Tropica, ebenso wie Claus sind gute Freunde, die ich schon lange Zeit kenne.

Wir sind uns einig darüber, dass lediglich die Personen die dem Hobby Aquaristik nachgehen die Probleme haben! haha!

Traurig, aber wahr.

Ich hinterfrage die Sachen, wohingegen der "Aquarianer" eine Aussage macht und darauf testet und schaut ob seine Ratschläge und seine Hypothese korrekt sind.

Wie die meisten Forscher nutze ich das Prinzip der Falsifizierung (schaut nach Karl Popper für mehr Informationen)

Wenn wir annehmen, dass ein Überschuss an PO4 zu Algenblüten in Pflanzenaquarien führt, dann sollte ein PO4 Überschuss auch in anderen stabil laufenden Referenzaquarien zu Algen führen, wenn alle anderen Faktoren nicht limitiert sind.

Wenn wir eben dies nicht feststellen können, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass ein PO4 Überschuss nicht zu Algen in einem Pflanzenaquarium führt.

Wenn wir große Mengen an anorganischem PO4 durch KH2PO4 hinzufügen, in einem Bereich bis 2.0 mg/l PO4, kann mit Sicherheit von einem "Überschuss" ausgegangen werden.

Wir betreiben dies in den USA seit über einem Jahrzehnt und bis jetzt konnte keine Korrelation zwischen PO4 Überschuss und Algen nachgewiesen werden.

Dies ist eine lange Zeit und betrifft tausende von Pflanzenaquarien!
Dies ist nicht irgendeine Abweichung einer besonderen Situation.
Und dies betrifft alle Pflanzenaquarien und dichter bepflanzten Becken mit 50-70% Pflanzenanteil.

CO2, Excel (oder auch Easycarbo) oder nicht CO2, ebenso in subtropischen Seen mit 50% oder mehr Wasserpflanzenanteil (Florida, USA hat über 7800 Seen und viele sind davon gut bewachsen, siehe hierfür Bachmann 2004 für mehr Informationen)

Diese Seen sind viel eher mit unseren Aquarien zu vergleichen (seicht, warm und sehr gut bepflanzt)

Bachmann, Canfield, Hoyer und an sich alle anderen Limnologen in Florida werden bestätigen, dass es keine Korrelation zwischen dem Trophic Status (Nährstoffgehalt) und Algen oder Wasserpflanzen gibt.

Keine.

Wir können dies in unseren Becken ebenfalls testen. Weder die Forschung selber oder unsere Tests im Aquarium konnten belegen, dass PO4 im Überschuss zu Algen führt.

Bedenke aber, dass es lediglich zeigt was nicht zu Algen führt, es impliziert nicht was zu Algen in deinem Becken führt oder das es dort keine Korrelation gibt, nur das es nicht die Ursache sein kann.

Die Düngung mit PO4 in einem sonst limitierten Becken kann beispielsweise zu einem sehr viel höheren Bedarf an CO2 führen. Wenn dieses Problem/Ungleichgewicht nicht behoben wird führt es zwangsläufig zu Algen, jedoch ist hierbei dann CO2 die Ursache für die Algen und nicht das PO4.

Solche Umstände bringen viele Aquarianer dazu Korrelationen als Ursachen anzusehen.
Dies ist ähnlich wie vor Gericht, bei der eine Person lediglich durch Indizien probiert wird zu überführen, anstatt mit richtigen Beweisen.

Wie Juristen werden hoffentlich auch Aquarianer ihre Entscheidungen anhand untermauerter Beweise fällen und nicht den Unschuldigen verurteilen.

Ich dünge seit über 15 Jahren hohe Phosphatwerte in meine Becken.
Wir haben hier in den USA auch viele Aquarianer, welche die PO4 Limitierung praktizieren, mit denen ich meine Resultate gut vergleichen kann.



Wenn die Nährstoffwerte toxisch sind, warum haben dann die Diskus und Apistos sich fortgepflanzt?
Wie kann es sein, dass ich Altums halten und in großer Menge aufziehen kann?

Ich verlasse mich dabei nicht auf Glück oder Magie.

Werfen wir einen weiteren Blick auf die Forschung:

Vor vielen Jahren haben viele Leute behauptet, dass ein Überschuss an Nährstoffen zu Algen führt, wie z.B. NO3 und PO4 Überschuss. Ich wollte herausfinden wie viel Überschuss hierfür erforderlich ist. Aus diesem Grund habe ich diese Stoffe hinzugegeben. Einige einfache Tests können diese Behauptungen leicht widerlegen.

In letzter Zeit haben andere Aquarianer behauptet, dass hohe PO4 und NO3 Werte schlecht für die Fische sind. Es wurden aber bis jetzt kaum PO4 toxische Werte veröffentlicht, da es in dem Bereich der Aquaristik zu keinen Vergiftungen führen kann. (10 mg/l PO4 oder weniger)

Genau wie bei den früheren Tests hinsichtlich der Algen wurden Behauptungen bezüglich der Fischgesundheit aufgestellt, die das gleiche Muster aufzeigen. Es werden Hypothesen aufgestellt, jedoch werden diese nicht mit Daten untermauert, ebenso werden keine richtigen Tests durchgeführt und es gibt ebenfalls keine fundierten Forschungsergebnisse auf diese sich die Personen stützen könnten. Es bleiben nichts weiter als nette unpräzise Worte.

Was wurde bis jetzt publiziert:

Pierce et al 1993 haben für Meerwasserfische vorgeschlagen:

“Vorangegangene Studien haben gezeigt, dass eine Langzeit Auswirkung von nitrate-N Werten über 100 mg/L einen schädlichen Einfluss auf Fische haben könnte (440 mg/l NO3). Diese Studie wurde unternommen, um die toxische Nitratauswirkung auf fünf unterschiedliche Meerwasserfische zu untersuchen, wobei Bestrebungen gemacht wurden die Nitratwerte in einem rezirkulierenden System zu reduzieren.“

Marco 1999, schlug vor, „empfohlene Nitratwerte für Warmwasserfische liegen bei (90 mg N-NO3-/L)"

Das N als NO3, wäre 4.4 mal 90 = ~400mg/L NO3.

Recht hoch.

Hier ist ein Link zu der geläufigen “fathead minnow“:

SETAC Journals Online – Akute und chronische Vergiftung durch Nitrat bei Fathead Minnows (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS), CERIODAPHNIA DUBIA, und DAPHNIA MAGNA

Rechnet hier die Werte für N-NO3 in NO3 mg/L um.
Es kommen recht hohe NO3 Werte raus ;). Beachte hierbei auch den Einfluss auf Wirbellose, die sehr viel bessere Testsubjekte als Fische sind.

Noch immer nicht überzeugt?

Wirf dann mal einen genauen Blick auf den Bereich „Fisch und Nitrat Toxizität“ in diesem Text unter Kapitel 3:

http://www.s2.chalmers.se/~tw/DOWNLOAD/ ... limits.pdf

Beachte hierbei die Werte mit 4.4 zu multiplizieren, um die NO3 Werte anstatt der N-NO3 Werte zu erhalten.


Wie du sehen konntest, können die Werte für Nitrat bei Warmwasserfischen sehr hoch sein und das diese Fische Fähigkeiten haben diesen hohen Werten gut zu widerstehen.
Wenn Fische beispielsweise sich Fortpflanzen zeigt dies klar ihr Verhalten (sie fühlen sich wohl) und spiegelt die empfindlichsten Lebenszyklen wieder (Eier und Larven). Bei mir pflanzen sich die Fische regelmäßig fort in so genannten Aquarien mit „Nitratüberschuss“ (30-40 mg/L)

Einige Personen haben nun behauptet, dass meine NO3 Dosis schlecht für die Fische ist, aber sie haben ebenso ihre Behauptungen nicht mit Tests, Forschungsergebnissen oder Erfahrungen aus Pflanzenaquarien belegt.
Ich habe Tests mit Algengarnelen und Amano Garnelen durchgeführt und habe die Nitratwerte bis 160 mg/L gesteigert, bis die ersten Ausfälle bei Garnelen auftraten. Fische dagegen haben keine schadhaften Effekte gezeigt.

Ich würde mich freuen, wenn diese Personen nicht nur ihre Auffassungen wiedergeben, sondern diese auch mit Beweisen untermauern.

Was ich aber immer wieder von diesen höre:

1. Behauptung, dass weniger besser ist. (aber sehr selten geben sie an wie viel weniger Besser ist oder welcher Spielraum einen dabei bleibt. Wo liegen die Nachteile und Vorteile in einem limitierten Ansatz?)
2. Keine Forschungsergebnisse auf die sich diese Personen stützen können (ich warte immer noch auf Studie, die deren Aussagen untermauern)
3. Anekdotenhafte Ratschläge von anderen Webseiten
4. toxische Grenzwerte für Menschen werden auf Fische übertragen
5. Keine Tests bezüglich der Toxizität von den Leuten die meine Tests/Methoden kritisieren
6. Behauptung, dass sich das Verhalten von Fischen unter hohen Werten ändert (Wie messen wir Verhaltensänderungen? Hier habe ich bis jetzt keine richtigen Vorschläge gehört, ich denke aber, dass die Fortpflanzung ein gutes Mittel darstellt, um das Verhalten zu beurteilen)
7. Die Personen keine Testaquarien aufsetzen und diese Tests wiederholt durchführen.
8. Fähigkeit Fische in ihren Aquarien zu Aufzuziehen
9. Keine Erfahrung mit hohen NO3 Werten über einen längeren Zeitraum aus Angst vor möglichen nachteiligen Folgen

Die Beweise müssen in dieser Hinsicht von den Kritikern erbracht werden.

Ich habe meine Arbeit getan, um meine Ratschläge zu untermauern, habe viel Zeit in die Tests gesteckt und habe jahrelang gesunde Fische gehalten. Die Leute sollten sich vielmehr fragen, ob die Kritiker ihre Annahmen ähnlich gut untermauern können?

Ich sehe dies bis jetzt noch nicht.

Dies ist nichts persönliches, es geht allein um das Thema und Antworten diesbezüglich.
Es geht darum, dass die Annahme „weniger ist besser oder das hohe Werte schädlich sind“ nicht ausreichen, ohne wirkliche Tests worin die Ursache liegt, ohne sich auf zufällige Beweise zu stützen oder rein auf Korrelationen.

Viele reagieren irritiert, wenn ich darauf beharre, dass sie ihre Position untermauern sollen, sie nehmen es schnell persönlich usw. Es geht aber hierbei um nichts persönliches, sondern um die Fische, das Hobby, die Methoden die wir nutzen und die Ratschläge die uns gegeben werden.

Ich akzeptiere Kritik lediglich nicht, wenn sie absolut falsch ist. Ich bleibe meiner Argumentationslinie treu und Frage so lange nach, bis die Personen mit wirklichen Beweisen kommen, anstatt lediglich von persönlichen Beobachtungen zu berichten.

Wir schauen uns die Beobachtungen und Tatsachen an, setzen einen Test auf, um zu sehen ob unsere Hypothese korrekte ist oder nicht. Erst darauf können wir Schlussfolgerungen treffen.

Ich habe dies alles durchgeführt.
Ich habe guten Rückenhalt aus Forschungsergebnissen.
Ich habe meine eigene Hypothese, dass höhere Nährstoffwerte nicht schädlich für Fische oder deren Fortpflanzung sind, getestet.
Ich habe diese Tests über die Jahre mehrmals wiederholt, auch bei vielen Arten, die eher Weichwasserarten sind.
Ich habe, wie auch viele andere, Fische in diesen Aquarien vermehrt.

Ich behaupte nicht, dass andere Methoden und Ratschläge schädlich für Fische sind oder Algen auslösen. Die Kritiker bringen diese Themen aber selber ins Spiel. Ich habe kein Problem mit Leuten, die hinter ihren Methoden stehen, wie auch immer diese aussehen. Wenn sie jedoch meine Methoden oder Ratschläge schlecht machen, dann verteidige ich diese.

Während ich meine Methoden verteidige, haben einige gemeint, dass ich ein übler Kerl bin. Diese Personen haben viele persönliche Vermutungen über mich als Person aufgestellt (einige sind davon wirklich lustig)
Solche persönlichen Angriffe sind absolut keine Argumente für deren Position.
Mein persönliches Leben spielt hier aber keine Rolle… und dies sollte es auch nicht.

Es geht um NO3 und um Fische sowie Garnelen.

PFK ist ebenfalls auf diesen Zug aufgesprungen:

http://www.practicalfishkeeping.co.uk/p ... p?news=560

Ich habe nichtmal viel über Algen und Wassertests mit ihnen gesprochen :D

Grüße
Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tobias Coring » 04 Aug 2007 08:42
Hi Tom and welcome to the forum,

thanks alot for your write-up. Alot of germans can understand english, but i'll translate your text for the rest anyway.

Alle Fragen die ihr direkt an Tom Barr habt, können natürlich auch auf Deutsch gestellt werden. Ich werde sie dann, so gut ich kann ;), für euch übersetzen.
Herzliche Grüße aus Braunschweig,

Tobias

Bitte sendet mir keine geschäftlichen Anfragen als private Nachricht.
Gerne helfen wir dir telefonisch unter +49 531 2086358 (Mo.–Fr. 9–17 Uhr) oder per E-Mail unter huhu@aquasabi.de weiter.

Lass es wachsen!

Bild
Zuletzt geändert von Tobias Coring am 04 Aug 2007 12:29, insgesamt 2-mal geändert.
Benutzeravatar
Tobias Coring
Team Flowgrow
Beiträge: 9860
Registriert: 02 Sep 2006 16:05
Wohnort: Braunschweig
Bewertungen: 28 (100%)
Beitragvon Twitch » 04 Aug 2007 09:12
Tobi hat geschrieben:Hi Tom and welcome to the forum,

thanks alot for your write-up. Alot of germans can understand german, but i'll translate your text for the rest anyway.

Alle Fragen die ihr direkt an Tom Barr habt, können natürlich auch auf Deutsch gestellt werden. Ich werde sie dann für euch übersetzen.


i hope so :lol:


But thank u Tom for your really nice Topic! Last picture is this a rotella?
Benutzeravatar
Twitch
Beiträge: 149
Registriert: 24 Jul 2007 16:10
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Sabine68 » 04 Aug 2007 10:45
Hallo Tobi,

auja - das wäre super, wenn du übersetzt, Meine letzten Englischstunden sind ca 20 Jahre her und bevor ich mich hier bis auf die Knochen blamiere :wink:

Hi Tom,

ein herzliches Willkommen und vielen Dank für die bereitgestellten Informationen.

Die Fotos sind einfach umwerfend und müßten eigentlich jeden Zweifler des EI eines besseren belehren. :wink:
[hr]Translation:
Hi Tom,

a hearty welcome and thanks a lot for all the informations. The photos are incredible and should convince all skeptical persons regarding the EI. :wink:[hr]
Viele Grüße
Sabine


Gibt dir das Leben Zitronen, mach Limonade draus
Benutzeravatar
Sabine68
Team Flowgrow
Beiträge: 2108
Registriert: 16 Mai 2007 20:13
Wohnort: Mayen
Bewertungen: 24 (100%)
Beitragvon Tobias Coring » 04 Aug 2007 12:01
so habe mal die Übersetzung rangehängt
Herzliche Grüße aus Braunschweig,

Tobias

Bitte sendet mir keine geschäftlichen Anfragen als private Nachricht.
Gerne helfen wir dir telefonisch unter +49 531 2086358 (Mo.–Fr. 9–17 Uhr) oder per E-Mail unter huhu@aquasabi.de weiter.

Lass es wachsen!

Bild
Benutzeravatar
Tobias Coring
Team Flowgrow
Beiträge: 9860
Registriert: 02 Sep 2006 16:05
Wohnort: Braunschweig
Bewertungen: 28 (100%)
Beitragvon Tobias Coring » 04 Aug 2007 12:28
Twitch hat geschrieben:
Tobi hat geschrieben:Hi Tom and welcome to the forum,

thanks alot for your write-up. Alot of germans can understand german, but i'll translate your text for the rest anyway.

Alle Fragen die ihr direkt an Tom Barr habt, können natürlich auch auf Deutsch gestellt werden. Ich werde sie dann für euch übersetzen.


i hope so :lol:


But thank u Tom for your really nice Topic! Last picture is this a rotella?


Hehe :D ja... hoffe ich auch :D, habs aber mal im eigentlichen Post doch auf Englisch abgeändert ;).

achja, die rote Pflanze sollte diese hier sein : Ludwigia inclinata var. verticillata 'Pantanal'
Herzliche Grüße aus Braunschweig,

Tobias

Bitte sendet mir keine geschäftlichen Anfragen als private Nachricht.
Gerne helfen wir dir telefonisch unter +49 531 2086358 (Mo.–Fr. 9–17 Uhr) oder per E-Mail unter huhu@aquasabi.de weiter.

Lass es wachsen!

Bild
Benutzeravatar
Tobias Coring
Team Flowgrow
Beiträge: 9860
Registriert: 02 Sep 2006 16:05
Wohnort: Braunschweig
Bewertungen: 28 (100%)
Beitragvon Beetroot » 04 Aug 2007 15:14
Hello Tom,

also a hearty welcome of me. A good and interesting statement about the fertilization of the nitrate and phosphate. I uses also the EI for my basin, however with reduced dosage.

with friendly regards
Torsten
Benutzeravatar
Beetroot
Beiträge: 1401
Registriert: 31 Dez 2006 01:04
Wohnort: Papenteich nähe Lockeland
Bewertungen: 7 (100%)
Beitragvon Sabine68 » 04 Aug 2007 17:45
Hallo Tobi,

schon mal vielen lieben Dank für deine Übersetzungsarbeit :)

Hi Tom,

gibt es Pflanzen, die bei solch hohen Nährstoffangeboten mit Wachstumsstörungen reagieren?
Oder zeigen sich eventuell auch Mangelerscheinungen durch Nährstoffverdrängung ( z.B. Kalium antagonisttisch zu Magnesium)?
Wenn ja, kann man das beziffern?

Vielen Dank

[hr]
Translation:

Hi Tom,

do some plant species react with stunting or curling to those high nutrient concentrations? Or is it possible that one nutrient in excess inhibits or blocks another nutrient? (like potassium antagonistic towards magnesium)?
If there is such a relationship can you give some numbers regarding those nutrient levels?

thanks a lot
Viele Grüße
Sabine


Gibt dir das Leben Zitronen, mach Limonade draus
Benutzeravatar
Sabine68
Team Flowgrow
Beiträge: 2108
Registriert: 16 Mai 2007 20:13
Wohnort: Mayen
Bewertungen: 24 (100%)
Beitragvon Ingrid » 06 Aug 2007 16:31
Hello,
the showed pictures from the tanks look real nice, no doubt.

...but, at a closer look (and compared with tanks of some friends) there seems to be a difference in growth compared to tanks with limited nutirient concentrations like PO4 (0,1 mg/l), NO3 (<10 mg/l) and FE (0,1 mg/l).

Some plants stunt at PO4 concentrations of 0,5 mg/l like ludiwigia inclinata "cuba". Hans. J. Krause recommends FE concentrations of ~0,1 - 0,2 mg/l max.
...for example at 0,5 mg/l FE and upwards there is an antagonistic effect regarding manganese.

In relation to this how much biomass (plants) do you remove from your tanks, running the high EI nutrient concentrations (20-30 mg/l NO3, PO4 2 mg/l, Fe 0,5 mg/l), at your weekly maintaince?
I know that those numbers are related to plant species (how much stem plants etc...) but an average value should be determinable.

The second question:

with heavy fertitlization (EI) there seems to be less/no algae in the tanks. Why?

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Guten Tag,
die gezeigten Ausschnitte der Becken sind sehr schön, kein Zweifel.

...aber, dennoch bei genauerem hinsehen (mir bekannter Becken bei Aquarienfreunden und Vergleich) von Becken mit kaum nachweisbaren werten in P04 (0,1 mg/l), NO3 (<10 mg/l) und FE (0,1 mg/l) im Zuwachs der Pflanzen zu unterscheiden.

Manche Pflanzen verkrüppeln bei PO4 werten über 0,5 mg/l z.B. die Ludwigia inclinata Cuba. Hans.-J. Krause empfiehlt FE werte um ~0.1-0,2 mg/l.
...bei über 0,5 mg/l werden manche Stoffe bei der Aufnahme behindert z.b. Mangan.

Mich würde in dem Zusammenhang interessieren, wie viel Blattmasse (tropfnass) nach dem Gärtnern pro Woche nach ORIGINAL EI geführten Werten im Becken entnommen wird.
Mir ist bewusst, dass das auch Pflanzen abhängig (Stengelpflanzenanteil) ist. Dennoch kann man im Durchschnitt einen Wert eines Durchschnitts Becken benennen.

Die zweite Frage, warum treten in Becken mit hohen nach dem Prinzip der EI Düngung weniger/keine Algen auf?

Danke an Tobi.
Ingrid
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 07 Aug 2007 23:20
Tobi hat geschrieben:Hi Tom and welcome to the forum,

thanks alot for your write-up. Alot of germans can understand english, but i'll translate your text for the rest anyway.

Alle Fragen die ihr direkt an Tom Barr habt, können natürlich auch auf Deutsch gestellt werden. Ich werde sie dann, so gut ich kann ;), für euch übersetzen.


Danka Tobi :D

Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 07 Aug 2007 23:32
Sabine68 hat geschrieben:Hallo Tobi,

auja - das wäre super, wenn du übersetzt, Meine letzten Englischstunden sind ca 20 Jahre her und bevor ich mich hier bis auf die Knochen blamiere :wink:

Hi Tom,

ein herzliches Willkommen und vielen Dank für die bereitgestellten Informationen.

Die Fotos sind einfach umwerfend und müßten eigentlich jeden Zweifler des EI eines besseren belehren. :wink:
[hr]Translation:
Hi Tom,

a hearty welcome and thanks a lot for all the informations. The photos are incredible and should convince all skeptical persons regarding the EI. :wink:[hr]



Well, not everyone, some have been led to believe things for many decades.
However, I am very much an empirical person, not easily convinced and must prove things to myself before believing them.

So I test and set up experimental design that falsifies things.
The photos are just some of my tanks over the years.

Some have very soft(0-1), some very hard KH's(10-18), but most have high GH(5-10 to 25).

I think many believe that "excess" is bad, however, if we apply that same notion to all of the components of plant growth, then less light, less CO2(not adding any) should also apply.

There are trade offs and test to do to show that is not an issue and to met a variety of goals.


I do not discount that leaner methods do not work, I know they do and have done them as well.
But........when folks suggest that high PO4 = algae, I know ths to be false and can support the arguement both with research and with experiements aquarists can do.

I do understand that to many, highe rPO4/NO3, often like many German's tap water :( is an issue.

In many cases, you do not even need to add NO3 or PO4, just do a large water change!
Same for the Dutch, then add Tropica Master grow etc, and lower light, CO2 and that's all.

The great German Botantist Leiberg suggested the concept of limiting factors for plant growth.
This was applied to limit algae, but plants require more PO4 and most other nutrients, whereas algae are adapted to very different conditions and ecology that plants in aquatic systems.

They are not in the same ecological niche(except for Chara, or larger marine seaweeds etc).
Old outdated, misapplied studies often where used, 10-20-30 years ago for support.

Such myths can take a very long time to overcome.


Regards,
Tom Barr
[hr]
Ãœbersetung:

Viele, aber nicht alle, haben das meiste in der Aquaristik über die Jahrzente einfach so hingenommen.
Wie auch immer, ich bin eine sehr empirisch veranlagte Person, die nicht so schnell zu überzeugen ist und daher teste ich die meisten Ding für mich selber, bevor ich sie glaube.

Darum setze ich einen Test auf, bei dem ich in einem experimentellen Design probiere diese Dinge zu falsifizieren.
Die Fotos sind nur einige meiner Becken, die ich über die Jahre gepflegt habe.
Einige haben sehr weiches Wasser (0-1) und andere sehr hartes Wasser in Bezug auf die Karbonathärte (10-18], aber die meisten haben eine hohe Gesamthärte (5-10 bis zu 25)

Ich denke viele glauben, dass ein “Überschussâ€
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 07 Aug 2007 23:39
Beetroot hat geschrieben:Hello Tom,

also a hearty welcome of me. A good and interesting statement about the fertilization of the nitrate and phosphate. I uses also the EI for my basin, however with reduced dosage.

with friendly regards
Torsten


Yes, you should try the reduction approach and watch the plants.
While I suggest higher levels, then you taper off till you find the right level where adding less has a negative impact on plants.

Then you dose a tad more than this, basically following Liebig's Law on the Minimum , making sure the plants never run out of nutrients.

Also, German Tap water?
Ack!
Lots of NO3 and PO4! already in there, do a few water changes to add more.

An interesting side note about how we found out excess PO4 does not = algae?
I had very high PO4 in my tap water and no algae but explosive plant growth.

So it was obvious that excess PO4 did not induce algae in a controlled tank with good CO2, light, NO3, K+, Traces, Ca, SO4, Mg etc since doing large weekly water changes always helped me:)

I was able to grow many harder tougher plants easier than other folks who could grow them here and there for awhile, but then they failed.

But I brought in large bags of plants every two weeks of rare hard to grow plants.
Better colors, fatter stems, faster growth etc.




Regards.
Tom Barr
[hr]
Ãœbersetzung:

Ja, du solltest den Reduzierungsansatz probieren und dich nach den Pflanzen orientieren. Auch wenn ich höhere Werte vorschlage, spricht nichts dagegen von diesen abzuweichen bis man einen negativen Effekt bei den Pflanzen feststellt.
Sobald dieser negative Effekt auftritt dosiert man einfach etwas mehr, grundlegend folgt man hierbei Liebigs Gesetz des Minimums, und stellt sicher, dass die Pflanzen immer ausreichend Nährstoffe haben.

Hast du ebenfalls typisches deutsches Leitungswasser?
Ack!
Es ist ja einiges an NO3 und PO4 bereits dort enthalten, also einfach ein paar Wasserwechsel, um neue Makronährstoffe hinzuzufügen.

Recht interessant zu erwähnen wäre, wie wir darauf gestoßen sind, dass PO4 Überschuss nicht zu Algen führt. Ich hatte sehr hohe PO4 Werte in meinem Leitungswasser, jedoch keine Algen dafür aber rasanten Pflanzenwuchs.
Aus diesem Grund war es offensichtlich, dass ein Überschuss an Po4 nicht zu Algen führt, wenn das Aquarium ansonsten gut mit Nährstoffen (No3, K+, Spurenelemente, Ca, SO4, Mg) versorgt ist, da große wöchentliche Wasserwechsel mir immer nur geholfen haben.

Ich konnte so viel einfacher schwierigere Pflanzen halten als andere Personen, welche diese hier und da für eine Weile halten konnten aber dann doch oft versagten.
Ich dagegen konnte diese Pflanzen Beutelweise alle zwei Wochen aus meinem Aquarium entnehmen. Hatte bessere Farben, dickere Stengel und schnelleren Wuchs etc.

Grüße
Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 07 Aug 2007 23:53
Hallo Sabine,

Good question!!!
The answer is yes, but I do not know with respect to NO3 nor PO4!!

Well over 150-200ppm for NO3!
Well over 10ppm for PO4!

KH?

Here's where we can see some issues as the KH rises.
About 10-20 species of plants prefer lower KH's, however, many like harderwaters, and as a rule, most plants will grow better in harderwaters(more Dissolved inorganic Carbon
sources, not just CO2!).

GH?

I'm not sure, my tap water has 52 mg/l Mg++, and I had 200ppm of Ca++ in anothe rlocation without issues, Crypts, many rare species all did very well.

I've surveyed about 300+ plant species and have not found any issues for K, PO4, SO4, Mg(maybe?), Ca++, NO3, Traces, Fe etc.

I'm sure they exists, but they are so far outside the ranges where we might make a mistake, that it's really a non issue.

See Shelford's law of Tolerances as an update to Liebig's law of the Minimum.

Good question, it might be noted that many plant species start to compete with eachother as nutrients become lower, but under higher non limiting conditions, this is not an issue.

I had several suspects I'd thought cause the other pkant to die off, allelopathy etc.......between plants, but every hyopthesis I made and tested proved to be false.

It is easy to test such hypothesis though!

I do not think there's any such evidence about K+ causing any issues, hundreds of aquarists added very high levels as was popular back in th late 1990's to mid 2000's and never ran into any such issues.

K+=> blocking Ca++ was the main hypothesis, but this was easily refuted.
See Erik Leung's AGA winning tank from 2002(?).
He has well over 100ppm, I tested to 50-60ppm of K+ and tride both high Ca(100ppm) and Mg(50ppm) and low levels(less than 5 for Ca, and less than 1ppm for Mg).
Never found any issues.

Please note, if you add something on purpose to test and cannot show the effect, then you know it cannot be due to that treatment(say high K+).

The test does not prove why other aquarists might be having issues.
Still, correltion does not = causation, there are secondary effects, one addition causes another nutrient you are not considering to be removed at a higher rate than the supply.

So you accuse the wrong nutrient of the cause.

Much like accusing a person of crime based on circumstantial evidence along rather than beyond a reasonable doubt.

Such logic does not hold up for law, nor does it for the hobbyists or scientist :idea:

Sabine68 hat geschrieben:Hallo Tobi,

schon mal vielen lieben Dank für deine Übersetzungsarbeit :)

Hi Tom,

gibt es Pflanzen, die bei solch hohen Nährstoffangeboten mit Wachstumsstörungen reagieren?
Oder zeigen sich eventuell auch Mangelerscheinungen durch Nährstoffverdrängung ( z.B. Kalium antagonisttisch zu Magnesium)?
Wenn ja, kann man das beziffern?

Vielen Dank

[hr]
Translation:

Hi Tom,

do some plant species react with stunting or curling to those high nutrient concentrations? Or is it possible that one nutrient in excess inhibits or blocks another nutrient? (like potassium antagonistic towards magnesium)?
If there is such a relationship can you give some numbers regarding those nutrient levels?

thanks a lot

[hr]
Ãœbersetzung:

Hallo Sabine,

Gute Frage!!!
Die Antwort ist ja, jedoch kenn ich die Werte für NO3 und PO4 nicht!

Sie müssen aber bei NO3 über 150-200mg/l liegen.
Bei PO4 über 10 mg/l.

KH?

Bei der Karbonathärte können wir Probleme feststellen, wenn diese ansteigt.
Ungefähr 10-20 Pflanzenarten präferieren eine niedrige Karbonathärte. Viele andere Pflanzen dagegen bevorzugen härteres Wasser. Als eine Regel kann man davon ausgehen, dass Pflanzen in härterem Wasser insgesamt besser wachsen. (mehr gelöste anorganische Kohlenstoffquellen durch die KH, nicht nur CO2!)

GH?

Hier bin ich mir nicht ganz so sicher, mein Leitungswasser hat 52mg/l Mg++ und ich hatte 200 mg/l Ca++ an einem anderen Wohnort ohne Probleme. Cryptos und viele andere seltene Arten wuchsen sehr gut.

Ich habe ca. 300+ Pflanzenarten beobachtet und konnte keine Probleme hinsichtlich K, PO4, SO4, Mg (vielleicht?), Ca++, NO3, Spurenelemente, Eisen etc. feststellen.

Ich glaube diese Blockierungen existieren sicherlich, jedoch sind sie soweit außerhalb unserer benutzen Nährstoffkonzentrationen, dass ich hierbei kein Problem sehe.

Hierfür kann man sich gut das Gesetz der Toleranz von Shelford als Ergänzung zu Liebigs Gesetz des Minimums ansehen.

Ebenfalls eine gute Frage, hier muss man berücksichtigen, dass Pflanzenarten hinsichtlich der Nährstoffaufnahme in Konkurrenz stehen, besonders unter limitierter Nährstoffzufuhr kann dies ein Problem werden, bei höheren Werten nicht.

Hier hatte ich einige Verdächtige unter meinen Pflanzen, in deren Gegenwart andere Pflanzen abstarben, durch Allelopathie oder ähnliches zwischen den Pflanzen. Jede meiner Hypothesen die ich testete stellte sich hierbei jedoch als falsch heraus.
Es ist relativ einfach eine solche Hypothese zu testen.

Ich denke es gibt keine Beweise für Probleme die im Zusammenhang mit Kalium stehen. Hunderte von Aquarianern fahren sehr hohe K+ Werte, die in den späten 1990ern bis der mitte 2000er sehr populär waren, und zu keinen Problemen führten.

K+ => Blockierung von Ca++ war die Haupthypthese, die jedoch leicht zu widerlegen war.
Hierfür muss man sich nur Erik Leungs AGA Gewinnerbecken aus 2001 ansehen.
Er hatte zu der Zeit über 100 mg/l K. Ich selber habe Tests mit 50-60 mg/l K gemacht und Versuche mit hohen Ca Werten (100 mg/l) und Mg (50 mg/l) sowie niedrigen Werten (Ca weniger als 5 mg/l und Mg weniger als 1mg/l) gemacht.
Ich konnte unter keinen Umständen Probleme feststellen.
Bedenke hierbei, wenn du einen Nährstoff gezielt hinzufügst, um damit etwas zu testen, und dabei nicht den Effekt erzielen kannst, dann kann es nicht an dem Nährstoff selber liegen (K+)

Der Test zeigt jedoch nicht auf, warum andere Aquarianer Probleme haben.
Wieder ist Korrelation nicht mit Kausalität zu verwechseln. Es gibt weitere Effekte, die hierbei berücksichtigt werden müssen. Die Zugabe eines Nährstoffs kann dazu führen, dass ein anderer Nährstoff schneller verbraucht wird und das Nährstoffdepot im Becken hierfür nicht langt.

Hierbei würde man den falschen Nährstoff des Übels bezichtigen.

Dies trifft auf Personen zu, die eines Verbrechens beschuldigt werden, welches sich nur auf Indizienbeweise stützt, anstatt auf handfeste Beweise zurückzugreifen.

Diese Logik trifft nicht für Juristen zu, sie ist ebenfalls nicht auf Aquarianer und Wissenschaftler anzuwenden.

Grüße
Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
Beitragvon Tom Barr » 08 Aug 2007 00:18
Ingrid hat geschrieben:Hello,
the showed pictures from the tanks look real nice, no doubt.

...but, at a closer look (and compared with tanks of some friends) there seems to be a difference in growth compared to tanks with limited nutirient concentrations like PO4 (0,1 mg/l), NO3 (<10 mg/l) and FE (0,1 mg/l).


I raise this plant in large amounts at 2-3ppm of PO4.
I know because I add no less than 3ppm per week of KH2PO4.

This cannot be true, it does not imply why they get stunting, only what it cannot possibly be.

If you assume that this hypothesis is "true", then adding 2-3ppm of PO4 should induce stunting, it's not just myself, but many folks raise this plant at such levels without any issues.

Here's the photo to show you:

Bild

And :

Bild

The plants in the rear top are "Cuba".
"HC" also is easy to grow at high PO4.

Some plants stunt at PO4 concentrations of 0,5 mg/l like ludiwigia inclinata "cuba". Hans. J. Krause recommends FE concentrations of ~0,1 - 0,2 mg/l max.
...for example at 0,5 mg/l FE and upwards there is an antagonistic effect regarding manganese.


I've long added large amounts of traces without ever seeing any anatogonism in aquatic plants.
I've added up to 2ppm of traces in this tank above.
I've added 6-10ppm of Fe for lab studies growing aquatiuc weeds without any issues.

I added 200mls of SeAchem Flourish to 80 liters of tank for 3 days without issue, that's right, 200mls!!

I agree Fe and Mn entact and can have an influence on eachother, but that's terrestrial and very high levels in hydroponic culture, not aquatic systems where the tank is controlled and non limiting for the independent variables like CO2, NO3, K+, PO4 etc.

The KH and the type of chelator to bind the Fe also plays a large role.
I like several, a blend of chelators.

I developed and am testing one such product right now.

In relation to this how much biomass (plants) do you remove from your tanks, running the high EI nutrient concentrations (20-30 mg/l NO3, PO4 2 mg/l, Fe 0,5 mg/l), at your weekly maintaince?


Depends :lol:
Some tanks have lots of Crypts and hardscaping, less pruning= less work!
Some are lower light= less work.
Some are higher light= more work.

Generally I try to prune every 2 weeks or so.
Good fluffing and cleaning weekly.
I likely remove about, 50-80% every two weeks or so with stem plants in terms of biomass under higher light.

With less light or non cO2 methods, I might only do this monthly or every 2-6 months.



I know that those numbers are related to plant species (how much stem plants etc...) but an average value should be determinable.

The second question:

with heavy fertitlization (EI) there seems to be less/no algae in the tanks. Why?


Hehe :D
Why do you think that is so?
Can you propose a hypothesis as to why that might be?

Think about a herd of elephants and pack of mice, which can live on less and eat more things, and which require more stable conditions?
Which can reproduce sexually faster?

I have a theory, one that has strong support, but I've not confirmed it even though I've had it sitting on the table for many years, haha, NH4 is the key.

At high growth rates(CO2 adds 10X the growth rates), non limiting nutrient levels, plants will strip out all the NH4 form the water column and fish waste.

NH4 acts a germination signal to an algae spore(like a seed planted in the spring senses the warmer temperatures , wet spring rains and longer day length).

These spores settle in the sediment and wait.

Then we uproot plants, pulling them up a long with organic matter and and little NH4, if you do a water cange right away, no algae, if not, you can get algae a lot more frequently.

Now, add some NH4 to an otherwise stable higher light light CO2 enriched tank=> algae.
Add progressively more and more fish or shrimp(I used Ghost shrimp for my test) until you get an algae bloom.

These both add NH4.
One inorganically, the other organically.

Now, add far more NO3 and PO4 and repeat this algae inducing test.

Get any algae?

No.

So you can assume that NH4 is causing the bloom.

Established adult algae are much tougher and long lasting, but rarely grow well.
The key is stopping the new algae growth, not the algae that's already there.

Once you do that, you have total control.

Such test show that we might have een premature in the assumption about excess NO3 = algae.

The NH4 is rapidly converted to NO3, so by the time we test the water when the algae are growing several days later, the NH4 is long gone.

Bacteria and algae have used it all up.

Why NH4?

It makes a good parameter to signal the algae spores to grow because it means that no one else (plants or other algae) are actively growing.

NH4 are typically low in vegetative areas and most is rapidly cycled, it's preferred(at low levels) over NO3.

So NH4 = algae blooms, NO3 does not.

Takes more energy and NO3 might be from many sources and last a lot longer.
It take smore energy also to assimilate NO3, vs NH4.
To a new spore, that's a lot and big difference in growth and success, to a large plant?
Nope.

Tobi, my old German physic professor is German, but forgot how to speak German.
So it can happen if you stay in the USA too long!

Regards,
Tom Barr

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Guten Tag,
die gezeigten Ausschnitte der Becken sind sehr schön, kein Zweifel.

...aber, dennoch bei genauerem hinsehen (mir bekannter Becken bei Aquarienfreunden und Vergleich) von Becken mit kaum nachweisbaren werten in P04 (0,1 mg/l), NO3 (<10 mg/l) und FE (0,1 mg/l) im Zuwachs der Pflanzen zu unterscheiden.

Manche Pflanzen verkrüppeln bei PO4 werten über 0,5 mg/l z.B. die Ludwigia inclinata Cuba. Hans.-J. Krause empfiehlt FE werte um ~0.1-0,2 mg/l.
...bei über 0,5 mg/l werden manche Stoffe bei der Aufnahme behindert z.b. Mangan.

Mich würde in dem Zusammenhang interessieren, wie viel Blattmasse (tropfnass) nach dem Gärtnern pro Woche nach ORIGINAL EI geführten Werten im Becken entnommen wird.
Mir ist bewusst, dass das auch Pflanzen abhängig (Stengelpflanzenanteil) ist. Dennoch kann man im Durchschnitt einen Wert eines Durchschnitts Becken benennen.

Die zweite Frage, warum treten in Becken mit hohen nach dem Prinzip der EI Düngung weniger/keine Algen auf?

Danke an Tobi.[/quote]

[hr]
Ãœbersetzung:

Ingrid hat geschrieben:Guten Tag,
die gezeigten Ausschnitte der Becken sind sehr schön, kein Zweifel.

...aber, dennoch bei genauerem hinsehen (mir bekannter Becken bei Aquarienfreunden und Vergleich) von Becken mit kaum nachweisbaren werten in P04 (0,1 mg/l), NO3 (<10 mg/l) und FE (0,1 mg/l) im Zuwachs der Pflanzen zu unterscheiden.

Manche Pflanzen verkrüppeln bei PO4 werten über 0,5 mg/l z.B. die Ludwigia inclinata Cuba.


Ich ziehe diese Pflanze in großen Mengen bei 2-3 mg/l PO4.
Ich weiß dies, da ich pro Woche nie weniger als 3 mg/l KH2PO4 hinzugebe.

Dies zeigt klar, dass PO4 keine Verkrüppelungen hervorruft, jedoch nicht warum deine Bekannten die Verkrüppelungen haben.

Wenn du jedoch annimmst, dass diese Hypothese „wahr“ ist, dann müsste ein PO4 Eintrag von 2-3 mg/l diese Verkrüppelungen hervorrufen. Nicht nur ich ziehe diese Pflanze ohne Probleme, auch viele andere Aquarianer halten sie bei diesen Werten.

Hier ein Foto um das ganze zu verdeutlichen:

Bild

und :

Bild

Die Pflanzen hinten oben sind "Cuba"
"HC" wächst bei hohen PO4 Werten ebenfalls sehr gut.

Hans.-J. Krause empfiehlt FE werte um ~0.1-0,2 mg/l.
...bei über 0,5 mg/l werden manche Stoffe bei der Aufnahme behindert z.b. Mangan.


Ich gebe schon lange Zeit höhere Mengen an Spurenelementen in meine Aquarien, ohne dabei antagonistische Effekte auf die Pflanzen feststellen zu können.

Ich habe über 2mg/l Spurenelemente in das Becken hier oben eingebracht.

Ich habe 6-10 mg/l FE während einer Labor Studie über wuchernde Wasserpflanzen hinzugefügt, ohne ein Problem feststellen zu können.

Ich habe 200 ml Seachem Flourish für 3 Tage in ein 80 Liter Becken gegeben, ohne Mängel feststellen zu können. 200 ml!!

Ich bezweifel nicht, dass Fe und Mn sich beeinflussen, jedoch primär in terrestrischen Situationen und in sehr hohen Konzentrationen bei hydroponischen Kulturen, jedoch nicht in kontrollierten aquaristischen Systemen, bei denen die unabhängigen Variablen wie CO2, No3, K+ und PO4 unlimitiert sind.

Die KH und die Art der Chelatoren die das Fe bindet spielt in diesem Zusammenhang eine große Rolle. Ich bevorzuge aus diesem Grund unterschiedliche Chelatoren.

Ich habe so einen Dünger entwickelt und teste ihn gerade.

Mich würde in dem Zusammenhang interessieren, wie viel Blattmasse (tropfnass) nach dem Gärtnern pro Woche nach ORIGINAL EI geführten Werten im Becken entnommen wird.
Mir ist bewusst, dass das auch Pflanzen abhängig (Stengelpflanzenanteil) ist. Dennoch kann man im Durchschnitt einen Wert eines Durchschnitts Becken benennen.


Kommt drauf an 
Eine Becken haben viele Cryptos und Hardscape, somit muss ich weniger einkürzen und habe weniger Arbeit.
Einige Becken haben weniger Licht = ebenfalls weniger Arbeit
Einige sind Starklichtbecken = diese erfordern mehr Arbeit

Generell probiere ich alle zwei Wochen die Pflanzen zu beschneiden.
Gut Ausdünnen und Säubern jede Woche.
Ich entferne ca. 50-80% Biomasse alle zwei Wochen in Becken mit viel Licht und vielen Stengelpflanzen.

In Becken ohne Co2 oder mit weniger Licht tue ich dies nur monatlich oder sogar nur alle 2-6 Monate.


Die zweite Frage, warum treten in Becken mit hohen nach dem Prinzip der EI Düngung weniger/keine Algen auf?


Hehe :D,
Warum glaubst du ist es so?
Kannst du eine Hypothese aufstellen woran dies liegen könnte?
Denk hierbei an eine Herde Elefanten und einen Gruppe Mäuse. Welche von beiden benötigt weniger und welche braucht mehr Nahrung und welche braucht stabilere Konditionen?
Welche kann sich schneller reproduzieren?

Ich habe eine Theorie, eine die recht starke Rückendeckung hat, jedoch konnte ich sie bis jetzt noch nicht bestätigen, obwohl ich dies schon seit Jahren vorhabe, haha. NH4 ist der Schlüssel.

Unter sehr üppigen Wuchsbedingungen (CO2 beschleunigt den Wuchs um ca. das 10 fache), nicht limitierten Nährstoffwerten verbrauchen die Pflanzen jegliches NH4 aus der Wassersäule und aus den Fischexcremeenten.

NH4 dient hierbei als Keimsignal für die Algensporen (wie ein Pflanzensamen im Frühling die wärmeren Temperaturen, die Frühlingsschauer und die längere Tageszeit wahrnimmt)

Diese Sporen setzen sich im Substrat ab und warten.

Wenn wir nun Pflanzen entwurzeln und sie mit viel organischem Material und ein bischen NH4 aus dem Substrat ziehen und keinen Wasserwechsel im Anschluss machen, haben wir sehr viel wahrscheinlicher mit Algen in naher Zukunft zu kämpfen.

Jetzt füge einiges an NH4, in ein sonst stabiles Starklichtbecken mit CO2 Versorgung, hinzu => Algen.
Gebe mehr und mehr Fische oder Garnelen in das Becken bis du eine Algenblüte ausmachen kannst.

Durch beide Situationen wird NH4 ins Becken eingebracht. Eins ist anorganisch, das andere organisch.

Nun gib sehr viel mehr NO3 und PO4 in das Becken und wiederhole den Test.
Treten nun Algen auf?

Nein.

Aus diesem Grund kann man davon ausgehen, dass NH4 für die Algenblüte verantwortlich ist.

Etablierte erwachsene Algen sind sehr viel hartnäckiger, jedoch wachsen sie nicht so rapide. Der Schlüssel liegt in der Verhinderung von neuem Algenwuchs und nicht in der direkten Bekämpfung der „erwachsenen Algen“

Sobald dies erreicht ist, hat man die totale Kontrolle.

Solche Tests zeigen, dass wir vielleicht zu voreilig waren bei der Annahme, dass ein Überschuss an NO3 zu Algen führt.

Das NH4 wird schnell in NO3 umgewandelt, wenn wir also das Wasser bei einem Algenbefall testen ist das NH4 schon lange verbraucht bzw. umgewandelt.

Bakterien und die Algen haben es bereits komplette verbraucht.

Warum aber gerade NH4?
Es kann gut dazu eingesetzt werden, um Algensporen (in einem ansonsten leeren Becken) zum Wuchs zu veranlassen, da nichts anderes (Pflanzen oder Algen) aktiv wachsen.

NH4 kommt typischerweise in vegetativen Gebieten sehr gering vor und wird hauptsächlich schnell umgewandelt, es wird (in niedriger Konzentration) gegenüber NO3 bevorzugt aufgenommen.

Also NH4 = Algenblüte, NO3 keine.

NO3 braucht zwar mehr Energie um verarbeitet zu werden, es kann aber auf viele Arten in das Becken eingebracht werden und es hält länger.

Für NO3 wird mehr Energie benötigt wird als für die Assimilation von NH4.
Spielt dies für eine neue Algenspore, die sich fundamental in Wuchs und Erfolgsaussichten unterscheidet, eine Rolle im Gegensatz zu einer großen Pflanze?
Nein.

Grüße,
Tom Barr
Tom Barr
Beiträge: 106
Registriert: 02 Aug 2007 02:44
Bewertungen: 0 (0%)
72 Beiträge • Seite 1 von 5
Ähnliche Themen Antworten Zugriffe Letzter Beitrag
Test
Dateianhang von Martin85 » 22 Aug 2016 19:37
0 0 von Gast Neuester Beitrag
01 Jan 1970 01:00
Test für Pflanzennährstoffe
von Mat_Hias » 15 Apr 2013 16:00
4 794 von Anubis Neuester Beitrag
15 Apr 2013 20:20

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: 0 Mitglieder und 0 Gäste