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Postby RareAquaticPlants » 21 Mar 2011 18:52
RareAquaticPlants wrote:Hello Heiko,
many thanks for information :)

i had same your concers from the first moment. The opposite leaves (or distichous) are not common in Eriocaulon sp., i finded this images, ti's very similar to my plant, Xyris angustifolia:



font link is: http://delta-intkey.com/angio/www/xyridace.htm
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Postby Sumpfheini » 21 Mar 2011 21:46
Hello Massimo,
thank You and Giovanni very much, very interesting and informative article!
So the E. "Japan Needle Leaf" has equitant leaves (similar to Acorus or Iris), that's in addition to the distichous arrangement another character occuring also in Xyris, but not in Eriocaulon:
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx? ... _id=135197
Eriocaulaceae: leaf sheath indistinct, Xyridaceae: leaf sheath distinct:
http://www.mobot.org/mobot/research/apw ... ocaulaceae
And what's more, Cook (Aquatic Plant Book, 1996) notes "Some species such as Xyris aquatica and X. exserta are submerged".

Leaves fluctuant - ? Referring to the bending of the leaves?

I'm curious how the plant would flower!

Greetings,
Heiko
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Postby RareAquaticPlants » 22 Mar 2011 10:28
Hello Heiko,
thanks for interesting :):) Giovanni Bubici is very good tranlsator and great expert, he is a agronomist.

i don't see flower or inflorescence still, it's will be important for correct classification, i hope...

The leaves are rigid in first lenght (10cm about) and very fluctuant after: my leaves are over 50cm long!!!!
Unfortunately base rizhome parts (rizhome get from cut technique) are dead, only apical rhizome parts cutted alives.

Greetings,
Massimo Iannella
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Postby Sumpfheini » 22 Mar 2011 12:24
Hello Massimo,
The leaves are rigid in first lenght (10cm about) and very fluctuant after: my leaves are over 50cm long!!!!
OK, now I understand, the leaves are flexible or flaccid. When the plant is propagated enough, one could try to cultivate a specimen emersed or in very shallow water to enhance potential flower.

Regards,
Heiko
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Postby RareAquaticPlants » 22 Mar 2011 17:50
Hello Heiko,
leaves are flexible but very strong and fibrous, similar to Cyperaceae sp.

i will try emersed culture.
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Postby Sumpfheini » 22 Mar 2011 21:37
Hello Massimo,
leaves are flexible but very strong and fibrous, similar to Cyperaceae sp.
OK, that sounds very grass-like; in Cyperaceae the leaves are mostly tristichous, but another family that could be possible is Juncaceae, mostly with distichous leaf arrangement.
Cyperaceae sp.: Do You mean members of this family in general, or a particular aquarium plant so called in the hobby?

Btw., in the new Kasselmann book (2010) a "Cyperaceae sp." is described but not depicted, and the description may be in line with this "Eriocaulaceae sp. 'Type 2'": http://www.guitarfish.org/2007/07/11/er ... -sp-type-2
Here's a pic from a "Cyperaceae sp." looking like that: http://www.geocities.jp/tos_2344848/miz ... eae_sp.htm
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Postby NguyenAnders » 23 Mar 2011 05:10
Sumpfheini wrote:Hello Massimo,
leaves are flexible but very strong and fibrous, similar to Cyperaceae sp.
OK, that sounds very grass-like; in Cyperaceae the leaves are mostly tristichous, but another family that could be possible is Juncaceae, mostly with distichous leaf arrangement.
Cyperaceae sp.: Do You mean members of this family in general, or a particular aquarium plant so called in the hobby?

Btw., in the new Kasselmann book (2010) a "Cyperaceae sp." is described but not depicted, and the description may be in line with this "Eriocaulaceae sp. 'Type 2'": http://www.guitarfish.org/2007/07/11/er ... -sp-type-2
Here's a pic from a "Cyperaceae sp." looking like that: http://www.geocities.jp/tos_2344848/miz ... eae_sp.htm



Hello Heiko,

so do you think "Eriocaulaceae type 2" is not in the Eriocaulaceae family but rather in the the Cyperaceae family? A friend of mine is trying to flower it right now. Hopefully results will come :D

It indeed does not seem like other Eriocaulaceae spp. The stem is very fibrous and hard to tear, and the roots look nothing like those of Syngonanthus, Eriocaulon, Mesanthemum, etc.

regards

---Andrew
---Andrew---
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Postby Sumpfheini » 23 Mar 2011 11:06
Hi Andrew,
so do you think "Eriocaulaceae type 2" is not in the Eriocaulaceae family but rather in the the Cyperaceae family? A friend of mine is trying to flower it right now. Hopefully results will come :D
I don't know! Here I mean "Cyperaceae sp." as trade name for a particular aquarium plant, probably the same as "Erioc. sp. Type 2", I 've got the name from Kasselmann 2010 and the Japanese website in my link above. I have had the "Erioc. sp. Type 2" only for a short time and then I gave it away (i.a. Tobi). The diversity in the families Eriocaulaceae and Cyperaceae is high, and when the friend of You will have managed to flower it, it will be a great advance for ID!
At least, because of its structure (fibrous etc.) I guess "Eriocaulaceae Type 2" is something from the order Poales within the Monocotyledoneous plants. The Poales contain quite a lot of families, i.a. Eriocaulaceae, Xyridaceae, Juncaceae, Cyperaceae, Poaceae. (The plant surely doesn't belong to Poaceae)

Regards
Heiko
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Postby RareAquaticPlants » 26 Mar 2011 18:37
Hello,
excuse me for later :)
my suggest "Cyperaceae" was for describe leaves morfology only :)

rgds,
Massimo Iannella
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Postby feshfish » 24 Apr 2011 22:20
Hallo

Hier ein Eriocaulon lividum Höhe ca 20 cm schöne hellgrüne Farbe.

Mfg Jürgen

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Postby RareAquaticPlants » 25 Apr 2011 09:22
Wonderful plant,
i have not it, i would like :)
This species has leaves long, similar E. sp. 'Goias' but more rigid and vertical morfology.

Growing it's difficult?
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Postby feshfish » 09 May 2011 21:09
Hallo Massimo

The Eriocaulon lividum growing easy and fast.

Mfg Jürgen
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Postby feshfish » 12 May 2011 07:46
Hallo

Hier ein Eriocaulon truncatum.

Mfg Jürgen

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Postby kiko » 18 May 2011 10:46
Hi,
das ist glaub ich eine Ericaulon sp. Goias.
Entgegen der Angaben in der Datenbank scheint die Pflanze aber eher verhältnismäßig einfach.
Sie steht da unter 0.27W/L und die Pflanze scheint damit auch keine sonderlichen Probleme zu haben. (zwischen den pics liegen ca. 3-4Wochen, man beachte das die rotundifundra die direkt dahintersteht bei dem Schwachlicht hingegen untenrum blattlos ist, die Goias scheint wenig Licht allerdings noch verhältnismäßig gut zu tolerieren)

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grüße Olaf-Peter
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Postby Thilo » 30 May 2011 05:20
Hallo,

ich habe meine unbekannte Eriocaulon (die aus Thailand) mal in ein flaches Becken gesetzt. Die Blüten habe ich dann mit einem Pinsel bestäubt. Jetzt habe ich wirklich von zwei Pflanzen ein paar winzige Samen abnehmen können. Ich habe noch ein paar Pflanzen die Blüten treiben und werde das einfach noch einmal wiederholen.

Was denkt Ihr sollte ich versuchen die Samen gleich auszusähen oder besser ersteinmal ein paar Monate warten und dann aussähen?

Ich habe irgendwo im Netz mal einen Bericht gelesen in dem Samen von Eriocaulen ausgesäht würden. Leider finde ich diesen Bericht zur Zeit nicht.

Gruß Thilo
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